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Why we can't wait.

Author: Martin Luther King, Jr.
Publisher: New York : New American Library, 1964.
Series: Mentor book.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
In 1963, Birmingham, Alabama, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. launched the Civil Rights movement and demonstrated to the world the power of nonviolent direct action with this letter from Birmingham Jail. Why We Can't Wait recounts not only the Birmingham campaign, but also examines the history of the civil rights struggle and the tasks that future generations must accomplish to bring about full equality for African  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Martin Luther King, Jr.
ISBN: 0451626753 9780451626752
OCLC Number: 958495
Description: xi, 159 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 18 cm.
Contents: The Negro revolution, why 1963? --
The sword that heals --
Bull Connor's Birmingham --
New day in Birmingham --
Letter from Birmingham jail --
Black and White together --
The summer of our discontent --
The days to come.
Series Title: Mentor book.

Abstract:

In 1963, Birmingham, Alabama, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. launched the Civil Rights movement and demonstrated to the world the power of nonviolent direct action with this letter from Birmingham Jail. Why We Can't Wait recounts not only the Birmingham campaign, but also examines the history of the civil rights struggle and the tasks that future generations must accomplish to bring about full equality for African Americans. Dr. King's eloquent analysis of these events propelled the Civil Rights movement from lunch counter sit-ins and prayer marches to the forefront of the American consciousness.
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